The Art & Science of Recovery

This is to be held on the 15th of November. More details below.

Please contact me if you’re interested in attending.

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High stakes decisions, performance expectations, ambitious projects, adversity, balance, prioritisation, transition and change. We’re all living and working under uncertainty, stress and pressure.

Rather than just surviving, what can we do to thrive in these environments as individuals and teams?

In an interview style format, you’ll hear from two of Australia’s most respected performance coaches:

  • Dr Chris Gaviglio, Head of Strength & Conditioning at the Queensland Academy of Sport, and
  • Jonah Oliver, one of Australia’s top performance psychologists

It will be an in-depth exploration of the principles, tools and strategies for physical and mental recovery.

We’ll be talking about lessons learnt from elite performance for individuals and teams and how they can be applied at work, at home and in our daily lives.

[Proceeds from this event will go to the Leukaemia Foundation]

This event is for people who:

  • Have a passion for high performance for themselves and their teams
  • Are seeking tested strategies, tools, habits and routines to better manage everything from energy levels to decision making
  • Are looking for insights that are typically only shared with elite athletes and performers.

In this session you’ll hear:

  • Lessons from diverse experiences: from athletes to surgeons, from racing car drivers to executives
  • How these lessons can be applied at work and at home
  • How to manage and optimise recovery for individuals and teams
  • How to create a systematic approach to rest and recovery to be able to perform when it matters most
  • The concept of periodisation and how it can be applied across daily, weekly, monthly, yearly routines and disciplines
  • The danger of the myth of “always on” and what can be done about it
  • And much more.

About the guests:

Dr. Chris Gaviglio

  • Head of Strength and Conditioning at the Queensland Academy of Sport
  • Nearly 20 years of strength and conditioning training experience with Olympic sports and professional codes (Wallabies, Gold Coast Suns, QLD Maroons Rugby League)
  • Applied sports science researcher into performance biomarkers, blood flow restriction training and warm-up and peri-competition strategies
  • Product designer/entrepreneur: Thera-wedge, Backsak and the Sports Rehab Tourniquet
  • Speaker and consultant on enhancing human performance: From World Class to World Best
  • Husband and father of two.

Jonah Oliver

  • One of Australia’s leading performance psychologists
  • Combines sport psychology and neuroscience to facilitate peak performance
  • Nearly 20 years working in high performance from Olympians, executives and professional codes (Brisbane Roar, Gold Coast Suns, Essendon), to car racing teams (Porsche – Le Mans World Champion, V8s), indigenous performing artists and surgeons
  • Executive coach
  • Author, speaker, consultant on talent identification, leadership and organisational performance around the world
  • Husband and father of two.

Event Details:

  • Date: 15th of November
  • Format: 60 minute interview/discussion + 30 mins Q&A
  • Will begin at 7pm sharp to conclude at 8:30pm
  • Venue:
    Brisbane Broncos Clive Berghofer Centre [Their new training facility]
    81 Fulcher Rd,
    Red Hill
    Brisbane, 4059
  • Tickets: $65 each
  • Drinks & food available afterwards at the Broncos Leagues Club

 

Mistakes, Facilitation and Coaching Olympic All Stars – Arjan Vos

Arjan Vos is a Dutch women’s water polo coach and was responsible for a diverse squad at Queensland Academy of Sport. Some members of the squad were just beginning their elite water polo journeys as teenagers. Two of them – Bronwen Knox and Ash Southern – have been named in Olympic All Star teams. He is renowned for his approach to his athletes and the loyalty and trust he inspires.

In this conversation Arjan shares his coaching philosophies including:

  • the role of facilitation vs goal setting as a coach
  • His key coaching question and why it applies to juniors and veterans: What is their goal and how can I contribute?
  • why it’s important stay out of the way and not to give too much as a coach
  • the importance of truth
  • why coaching is an attitude
  • why creating space for mistakes is essential to improving
  • how and why he develops critical thinking in his athletes
  • his reflection strategies
  • and more.

Have you had any great coaches, teachers or mentors? What were their philosophies? Let me know in the comments.


People mentioned:

Resources:


 

Tatiana Grigorieva – Transitions, Fear and Willingness

Source: Fox Sports

Tatiana Grigorieva is an Olympic silver medallist (in pole vault, Sydney 2000), mother, coach, entrepreneur and all round fascinating person.

In this interview I did for the Queensland Academy of Sport Action TV series, we explore:

  • the transitions that have shaped her life through sport, business and motherhood including how she went from a hurdler to a silver medallist pole vaulter in just 2.5 years
  • how she manages fear
  • her meditation habits and the importance of visualisation in accelerating her training
  • how she encourages her athletes to think about the long term
  • her early childhood in Russia and why her mother made her sign a study contract when she was 13 years old
  • why willingness is the #1 characteristic of the athletes she works with
  • what it felt like to be jumping in the middle of the Olympic stadium for Cathy Freeman’s historic 400m gold medal.
  • and much more.

Enjoy!

What’s helped you through transitions? Let me know in the comments below.

Links from the interview:

Go Slow to Go Fast – a Business Lesson from Water Polo

Club Natacio Sant Andreu - Toby Jenkins

When I was up to my eyeballs in water polo, a part of my training was weekly martial arts sessions with Andy Sutton. Back in early 2002 he introduced me to the principle:

“Go slow to go fast.”

This wasn’t just counter intuitive when I first heard it – it seemed plain mad. We’d been training one on one in a park in West End in Brisbane and it really didn’t make much sense to me. At the time I opted to file it away in my subconscious in the “too hard basket”.

Later that same year I was offered a chance to play professionally in Barcelona, for a club called Sant Andreu. I was pumped.

When I arrived in Spain, I realised they had a different approach to training. The general theme of this approach was to opt for high quality at high intensity rather than the incredible volumes we were doing at home. Each session was focussed on skills, strength, game play or swimming. In comparison to Australia, where it was typical to pile on strength work on before, or skills or match work on after a swim session, a swim set was nearly always just a swim set.

 

Go slow

I don’t remember what triggered me to dredge up Andy’s advice, but I thought it would be a good time to test if going slow could actually help me go faster.

Over the course of dwelling on and trying to practice this concept in the swimming training, I realised that by going slow with every stroke, I was able to focus on each element of the stroke from the pull at the top of the stroke all the way through to the push at the end. I concentrated on keeping my body still in the water and stayed focussed on economy of motion. By going slow, I was able to break down my swimming into discrete elements that I could then practice and improve. I felt good, I felt strong and I started wonder if there might be a kernel of truth in the saying.

It was time to test the “go fast” piece. It was time to test myself against the clock.

 

Go fast

There is one swim set that stands out for me. It was a sprint set that culminated in 3 x 100m max efforts and an opportunity to prove myself to my new team. Having been training slow, I was fascinated to see if I could embody the principle.

At the end of the first 100m, I was surprised. I’d clocked around 59 seconds (a quick training time for me) and still really felt like there was more in the tank than I’d realised. The next 100m I focussed on increasing power, while maintaining my focus on each stroke and stillness in the water to see if I could go faster. 58 seconds. Even after this, I still felt like I could go faster. I kept  saying to myself throughout these 100s: go slow to go fast, go slow to go fast. 3rd 100m – 57 seconds.

These times are by no means quick by elite swimming standards but they were amongst the best I’d ever clocked in training and particularly that I was able to improve through the 3 was completely new for my sprinting. By breaking down the 100m into a series of discrete strokes, focussing on every piece of the execution, I was able to produce these times with an ease that I still clearly remember 11 years later.

 

How is this relevant to work now?

One of the problems we’ve had recently with projects has been rework. Ads and I have sat down to address this and ultimately came to reinforce the mantra of thrash upfront in your project planning to get everything out on the table. While it feels like its slowing you down, focussing on and hammering out the details of what actually needs to be done ultimately saves huge amounts of time in the execution.

I’m also a huge believer in the agile approach to projects in that you can’t plan for everything and in fact to do can be dangerous. Slowing down to make the projects small enough to execute and revisiting these smaller projects at crucial points is also key to adjusting for new learning and delivering fast, quality projects.

 

Related quotes:

Since then I’ve heard a number of other phrases that to me, really relate to this philosophy.

“Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.”
This was taken from the movie Shooter with Mark Wahlberg where his character uses it as a mantra as he fires a rifle. A surprising source of inspiration 🙂

“Most people overestimate what they can do in one year and underestimate what they can do in ten years.” Bill Gates
I only became aware of this quote recently and I believe it reflects some of those same sentiments – to reduce the amount you try to do in a smaller time frame to accomplish much more in the longer period.

What do you think? Are there areas in your life/business that you’ve gone slow to ultimately go fast? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

 

How to Discover “Native Genius” – Taking action on Multipliers

This is a follow up on my previous blog post, the 4 Key leadership learnings from Multipliers.

On Monday this week, Adam organised a “Native Genius” session for one of our Bluewire Media monthly meetings. It was a cracker! In fact it is probably one of the best sessions we’ve ever conducted with our team.

Here’s what I wrote to Liz Wiseman and Greg McKeown as feedback on the session:

I can’t tell you how energizing it was! It’s incredible to watch people around the table really identify what is the absolute best in their team mates. Then the reaction of the person in the “hot seat” – as they come to realise what others believe is their strongest quality, understand what it is that really drives them and realise how it translates not just to work, but across all aspects of their lives – was inspiring! The formal reviews we had scheduled for the next day were quite different as a result too.

If you wanted to watch the same unfold in your organisation, here’s how the session rolled out:

  • Get your group together (we did it with 6 of us – this was a good size and we had all been working together for quite a while which probably helped too)
  • Read through the description of “Native Genius” from the book:

A native genius is something that people do, not only exceptionally well, but absolutely naturally. They do it easily (without extra effort) and freely (without condition)…They get results that are head-and-shoulders above others but they do it without breaking a sweat.

  • Choose the person whose “Native Genius” you want to discover (let’s call it putting them in the “Hot Seat”)
  • Read through the 5 discovery questions (p48 ):

What do they do better than anything else they do?

What do they do better than the people around them?

What do they do without effort?

What do they do without being asked?

What do they do readily without being paid?

  • Get everyone’s input on that person’s Native Genius and write them down
  • Once everyone in the group (including the person in the “Hot Seat”) has had their say, summarise and then label their Native Genius!
  • Repeat this process, including the description and the questions, for each person in the group.

Good luck!

If you give this a try, I’d love to hear how your team responded and what you got from it.